John McCurley

Attorney (University of San Francisco School of Law)

John McCurley started writing criminal law articles for Nolo as a freelancer in 2015. He joined the Nolo staff as a Legal Editor in 2016.  

Education. John has a bachelor’s degree in engineering physics from the University of California, San Diego, and completed law school at the University of San Francisco School of Law in 2008.

Legal training. During law school, John became interested in the criminal justice system while interning with the Prison Law Office and the San Francisco and Contra Costa County public defender’s offices. After graduating and passing the California Bar in 2008, John practiced criminal defense and juvenile dependency law, primarily doing writs and appeals.

Legal career. John is currently a member of the California State Bar and has been a certified appellate law specialist since 2017 (certification from by the State Bar of California Board of Legal Specialization). John maintains a small private practice in San Diego (see www.mccurleylaw.com), handling mostly court-appointed juvenile dependency appeals out of various Southern California counties. He has a number published victories, including In re Juarez (2010) 182 Cal.App.4th 1316, K.F. v. Superior Court (2014) 224 Cal.App.4th 1369, People v. Hill (2015) 236 Cal.App.4th 1100 (co-counsel), and In re Bianca S. (2015) 241 Cal.App.4th 1272.


Articles By John McCurley

DUI Charges and Penalties
An overview of DUI (driving under the influence) offense classifications and possible consequences.
Driving on a Suspended or Revoked License in Arkansas
Arkansas' Office of Driver Services may suspend or revoke your license for a range of driving or other offenses. If you drive with a suspended or revoked license, you may be charged with a crime.
Driving on a Suspended or Revoked License in Missouri
If you are licensed to drive by the state of Missouri, your driving privileges may be suspended or revoked for numerous reasons. Driving before your license is reinstated is a crime. If you drive when your license is invalid, you may be charged with a misdemeanor, or in some cases a felony.
Driving on a Suspended or Revoked License in Louisiana
"Driving is a privilege and not a right." In Louisiana, this saying is borne out through the many ways your license may be suspended or revoked. A number of criminal convictions, driving offenses, and other matters can cause the loss of your license. If you drive while your license is suspended or revoked, you could be charged with a crime.
Driving on a Suspended or Revoked License in New Hampshire
In New Hampshire, your license may be suspended or revoked for a variety of reasons, including driving offenses, criminal convictions, and matters unrelated to driving. It is illegal to drive on a suspended or revoked license. If you do, you may be charged with a violation or a crime.
Driving on a Suspended or Revoked License in Michigan
Like all states, Michigan may suspend or revoke your driving privileges for many reasons. If you drive with a suspended or revoked license, you may be charged with a crime. In some cases, you may even be charged with a felony.
Driving on a Suspended or Revoked License in North Dakota
In North Dakota, your license may be suspended or revoked for certain criminal convictions, failures to appear in court, and other reasons. If you drive while your license is suspended or revoked, you may be charged with a crime.
Driving on a Suspended or Revoked License in Utah
Like all states, Utah may suspend or revoke your license for a variety of reasons. Driving while your license is suspended or revoked is a crime. A conviction may result in fines or jail time.
Driving on a Suspended or Revoked License in Texas
Like all states, Texas may suspend or revoke your license for many reasons. The state takes a suspension or revocation seriously and may charge you with a crime if you drive when your license is not valid.
Driving on a Suspended or Revoked License in New Mexico
Your New Mexico driver's license may be suspended or revoked for a range of reasons. If you drive on a suspended or revoked license before your license is reinstated, you may be charged with a crime.