Driving on a Suspended License in Florida

Criminal charges for driving with a suspended or revoked license.

Lots of different circumstances can lead to a Floridian's license to be suspended or revoked. Suspension is a temporary withdrawal of your license. Revocation means Florida terminates your privilege to drive. If you drive with a suspended or revoked license, you could face a range of criminal penalties.

Reasons for License Suspensions in Florida

Certain driving offenses, criminal convictions, and civil matters can result in license suspension or revocation.

Point-Related Suspensions

For most minor traffic violations, you might have to pay a fine but won't have to worry about losing your license. However, if you rack up too many violations, license suspension is possible.

Florida uses a traffic violation point system and will suspend the license of drivers who accumulate too many points. Drivers who get 12 or more points within 12 months, 18 or more points within 18 months, or 24 or more points in 36 months face license suspension.

Criminal Conviction Suspensions

Lots of criminal convictions can lead to license suspension or revocation. The list of offenses includes:

This is only a partial list. Lots of other offenses can result in the loss of driving privileges.

Other Types of Suspensions

Regardless of points, your license can be revoked if the State of Florida considers you a habitual offender of certain traffic laws. And, certain conduct unrelated to driving, such as failing to pay child support, can result in license suspension.

Reinstating Your License

After your period of suspension or revocation, you will need to apply for reinstatement before you may drive again. You may need to apply for a new license if your license was revoked.

The reinstatement fee for a suspended license is $45. The fee is $75 for a revoked license, plus the application fee for a new license.

If your revocation or suspension was due to DUI or refusing to submit to a test to determine whether you are intoxicated, you may be charged another $130. In some situations, such as if your suspension or revocation is due to a false or fraudulent insurance claim, you may be charged an additional $180 for reinstatement.

Charges for Driving After Suspension or Revocation

If you are charged with driving after suspension or revocation in Florida, the type of charge may depend on whether you have previous convictions for driving after suspension or revocation. The following apply to many, but not all, situations:

  • First violation. Your first conviction may be a second-degree misdemeanor, punishable by a maximum fine of $500 and up to 60 days in jail.
  • Second violation. Your second conviction may be a first-degree misdemeanor, punishable by a maximum $1,000 fine and up to one year in jail.
  • Third or subsequent violation. Your third or subsequent conviction may be a third-degree felony, punishable by a maximum fine of $5,000 and up to five years in prison.

If your license is revoked because the state of Florida considers you a habitual offender, you may be charged with a third-degree felony for driving after revocation. The maximum penalties noted above for a third-degree felony (or other penalties) may apply.

In some situations, driving on a suspended or revoked license can also result in vehicle impoundment.

Seeking Help for Charges of Driving After Suspension or Revocation

If you are charged with driving after suspension or revocation in Florida, consider hiring a lawyer to represent you. A conviction may result in fines or even a jail sentence. You may experience problems keeping employment, traveling to school, obtaining insurance, and going about your daily life. Although the law provides specific penalties for a conviction, your sentence will depend on how prosecutors and the courts view the crime. An attorney who is familiar with how these cases are handled in your area will be able to provide guidance about your individual situation.

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