Driving on a Suspended License in Nebraska

Criminal charges for operating a vehicle on a suspended or revoked license.

In Nebraska, your license can be suspended or revoked for a number of reasons. Suspensions and revocations might result from criminal convictions, violating administrative rules, or certain traffic violations. But, regardless of the reason for the loss of driving privileges, driving during a suspension or revocation is a criminal offense.

Reasons for Suspension or Revocation

Depending on the situation, suspension or revocation can be mandatory or discretionary. For example, a judge has the option to suspend your license if you are convicted of motor vehicle violations under circumstances where you endangered another person or property of another. In other scenarios, revocation is mandatory. Examples of criminal convictions that lead to mandatory revocation include:

Your license can also be revoked for refusing to submit to an alcohol test in violation of the state’s implied consent laws (even if you’re not convicted of a DUI).

Your license may be administratively revoked by the state if you:

  • are the driver in an accident in which someone was injured or killed or which involved serious property damage
  • are a habitually reckless or negligent driver
  • habitually violate traffic laws
  • are incompetent to drive a motor vehicle, or
  • committed fraud when you applied for a license.

These are just some of the reasons you might lose driving privileges. Lots of other circumstances can lead to suspension or revocation of your license.

Reinstating Your License

The duration of your suspension or revocation depends on the circumstances. After your period of suspension or revocation expires, you typically need to pay a reinstatement fee and might be required to meet other conditions before you’ll be allowed to lawfully drive again.

Generally, the reinstatement fees are $50 after a suspension and $125 after a revocation.

Criminal Charges for Driving on a Suspended or Revoked License

Driving on a revoked or suspended license is generally a class I, class II, or class III misdemeanor. Here are the classifications and possible penalties for different types of offenses:

  • Standard first offense. Generally, a first violation of driving on a suspended or revoked license is a class II misdemeanor and carries a maximum six months in jail, up to $1,000 in fines, and at least another one year of revocation time.
  • Standard second or third offense. Generally, a second or third driving-on-a-suspended-or-revoked violation is a class II misdemeanor and carries a maximum six months in jail, up to $1,000 in fines, and at least another two years of revocation time.
  • Standard fourth or subsequent offense. Generally, a fourth or subsequent violation of driving on a suspended or revoked license is a class I misdemeanor. A conviction carries up to a year in jail, a maximum $1,000 fine, and at least another two years of revocation time.

These are the generally applicable penalties, but the circumstances of each case are different, so the consequences of a conviction also differ quite a bit.

Legal Help for Charges of Driving After Suspension or Revocation

You may face severe consequences if you are convicted of driving during suspension or revocation of your license. So, if you’re arrested for one of these offenses, you should talk to an experienced attorney. A qualified lawyer can help you understand what you’re up against and advise you on how best to handle your situation.

Talk to a Lawyer

Start here to find criminal defense lawyers near you.

How it Works

  1. Briefly tell us about your case
  2. Provide your contact information
  3. Choose attorneys to contact you
DEFEND YOUR RIGHTS

Talk to a Defense attorney

We've helped 95 clients find attorneys today.

How It Works

  1. Briefly tell us about your case
  2. Provide your contact information
  3. Choose attorneys to contact you