Kat McClain

Attorney

Kat McClain writes on the topic of criminal law for Nolo. She’s licensed to practice law in Arizona and Wisconsin, as well as the Western District Court of Wisconsin and the Central District Court of California.

Originally from the Midwest, Kat moved to Texas and attended the University of Texas, where she received her B.A. in Political Science and minored in Pre-Law. During her undergraduate studies, she worked as a child advocate in dependency court for East Texas Child Advocates.

She moved to Houston, one of the largest legal markets in the nation, to attend law school. While at the University of Houston Law Center, Kat actively pursued many different opportunities, including clerking for a family law judge and a nationally-known attorney, Rusty Hardin. After graduating from law school, she began practicing family law. While in Texas, she was a certified mediator and conducted mediations for small claims courts and the Better Business Bureau.

Always looking to improve her knowledge and skills, she moved to Southern California to get her LL.M. in Trial Advocacy at California Western School of Law. While on the West Coast, she added Landlord-Tenant law to her repertoire. Additionally, she worked with the California Innocence Project.

She eventually landed back in the Midwest, where she currently practices criminal defense and family law. When not working in her law practice, Kat enjoys politics, writing, reading, and watching her favorite sports teams.


Articles By Kat McClain

Understanding Vermont's Relief From Domestic Abuse Orders
Vermont law allows victims of domestic abuse to ask the court for a civil protective order—called a relief from abuse order—that prohibits an alleged abuser from contacting or harming the victim. Violators of relief from abuse orders can face incarceration time and monetary penalties.
Vermont Domestic Violence Crimes
A person who commits a domestic abuse offense in Vermont can face serious criminal penalties, including lengthy terms of incarceration, hefty fines, and restrictions on firearm possession.
Kansas Domestic Violence Laws
A person who commits a domestic violence offense in Kansas can face serious criminal penalties, including lengthy terms of imprisonment, substantial fines, and restrictions on firearm possession.
Understanding Kansas Domestic Abuse Protection Orders
Kansas law allows victims of domestic violence to ask the court for a protection from abuse order that prohibits the alleged abuser from contacting or harming the victim. Violators of these orders can face time in jail or even prison.
California Domestic Violence Laws
A person who commits acts of domestic violence in California can face serious criminal penalties, including lengthy terms of incarceration and hefty fines.
California Domestic Violence Protective and Restraining Orders
Violators of domestic violence protective and restraining orders can face jail time and substantial monetary penalties.
Tennessee Domestic Abuse Crimes
A person who commits domestic assault or a related offense in Tennessee can face serious criminal penalties, including lengthy terms of imprisonment, substantial fines, restrictions on firearm possession, and negative immigration consequences.
Tennessee Domestic Abuse Orders of Protection
Tennessee law allows victims of domestic abuse to ask the court for a civil protective order that prohibits an alleged abuser from contacting or harming the victim. Violators of domestic abuse protective orders can face time in jail and substantial monetary penalties.
Texas Family Violence Crimes
A person who commits an act of family violence in Texas can face serious criminal penalties, including lengthy imprisonment terms, hefty fines, restrictions on firearm possession, and immigration consequences.
Texas Family Violence Protective Orders
Texas law allows victims of family violence to ask the court for an order—called a family violence protective order—that prohibits the alleged abuser from contacting or harming the victim. Violators of family violence protective orders can face time in jail or even prison.