Driving on a Suspended License in Utah

Like all states, Utah may suspend or revoke your license for a variety of reasons. Driving while your license is suspended or revoked is a crime. A conviction may result in fines or jail time.

Reasons for Suspension or Revocation

Too many traffic violations, an alcohol offense, and certain criminal convictions are just some of the reasons that your license may be suspended or revoked in Utah.

Utah operates a points-based system for determining when your driver’s license should be suspended. Points are assessed against your license for each traffic violation, and your license may be suspended when you accrue a certain number of points. (Utah Code § 53-3-221(4)(a).)

Your driver’s license may be suspended or revoked for alcohol offenses. They include:

  • a conviction for driving under the influence or when your blood alcohol content is greater than .08, and
  • failing a chemical test to determine whether you are driving under the influence. (Utah Code § 53-3-220(1)(a), § 53-3-223(3).)

Your license may be suspended or revoked for certain other criminal convictions. They include:

  • manslaughter or negligent homicide, if you were driving a motor vehicle, or automobile homicide
  • two charges of reckless driving, impaired driving, or a combination committed within 12 months
  • certain felonies relating to driving laws, or a felony when  a vehicle was used to commit it
  • failing to stop if you are involved in an accident that kills or injures someone, and
  • engaging in a speed contest. (Utah Code § 53-3-220(1)(a).)

Your license may also be suspended or revoked if you:

  • drive recklessly or unlawfully and cause an accident that injures or kills someone or causes serious property damage
  • are incompetent to drive a motor vehicle
  • use a false driver’s license
  • have been convicted frequently enough of serious traffic violations that the state believes you disrespect traffic laws and disregard safety
  • fail to comply with a traffic citations in certain circumstances, or
  • have an outstanding unpaid fine, an outstanding incomplete restitution requirement, or an outstanding warrant. (Utah Code § 53-3-221(1), § 53-3-221(2), § 53-3-221(3).)

Your license may be suspended or revoked for other reasons as well.

Reinstating Your License

The period of time your license may be suspended or revoked may depend on the reason for the loss of your driving privileges and other factors. After your suspension or revocation period expires, you may be required to pay a reinstatement fee, other fees, or complete other conditions before your license is reinstated. (Utah Code § 53-3-205(12).) The reinstatement fee may be $30. (Utah Code § 53-3-105 (23)(a).)   If you are seeking reinstatement after an alcohol or drug offense, you may be required to pay an additional $35 fee. (Utah Code § 53-3-105(23)(b).)

Criminal Charges for Driving on a Suspended or Revoked License

If you drive while your license is suspended or revoked, you may be charged with a crime. In many cases, you may be charged with a Class C misdemeanor. (Utah Code § 53-3-227(2).) The maximum penalty for a Class C misdemeanor may involve:

  • up to 90 days in jail, and
  • a $750 fine (Utah Code § 76-3-204(2), § 76-3-301(1)(e).)

You may be charged with a Class B misdemeanor if your license was suspended for certain offenses, including:

  • refusing to take a chemical test to determine whether you were driving under the influence
  • driving under the influence of alcohol or controlled substances, or
  • automobile homicide. (Utah Code § 53-3-227(3)(a).)

The maximum penalty for a Class B misdemeanor may involve:

  • up to six months in jail, and
  • a $1,000 fine (Utah Code § 76-3-204(2), § 76-3-301(1)(d).)

In this circumstance you may be subject to a minimum fine of $750. (Utah Code § 53-3-227(3)(c).)

Legal Help for Driving on a Suspended or Revoked License

A conviction for driving on a suspended or revoked license may have serious consequences. In addition to fines and jail time, you may have difficulty at work or school, with insurance, and with other areas of your life. The law provides specific maximum penalties for a conviction, but your sentence will also be influenced by the views of local judges and prosecutors on the crime. An attorney who is familiar with these charges in your area is best able to provide you with information about your individual case.

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